Friday, 5 August 2016

Weekend reading and viewing: 6 - 7 August 2016

BBC 3, 2 August 2016
From being spoken to as if they are children, to assuming they can't work or have relationships. These seven statements are guaranteed to annoy people with Down's Syndrome ...




My daughter has Down syndrome. Would I "cure" her if I could?
Amy Julia Becker, Vox, 3 August 2016
... "What are you researching?" I ask. I try to sound casual, as if I am not greedy to hear more. This fourth-grade year is the first one when she has been willing, or able, to give me details about her day consistently.

"Down syndrome," she says. "My big question that I wrote on my piece of paper is, ‘Why is Down syndrome scary?’ ... I haven’t answered the question yet. I know you were scared when I’s born. But I don't know why."


Down Syndrome couple's lives touched community
Patrick Hite, News Leader (USA Today), 3 August 2016
If the doctors who thought John Ozyjowski and Dottie Baker would never be productive members of society had only seen what so many saw last week, you wonder what they would have thought.

Julius, billy goats and a little inclusive story
Catia Malaquias, Starting with Julius, 4 August 2016
... There was nothing extraordinary. Nothing inspirational. But something more … there was something legitimate, something common and something that should be ordinary ...

The Evolution of an Accidental Meme
Craig Frohle, 15 April 2016
Several versions of this graphic representation of the difference between equality and fairness/justice have often been used in discussion of barriers faced by people with disability. This one from 2014, removing all barriers to produce 'liberation', is sourced from The Meme Centre.

The meme was originally produced in 2012 by Craig Frohle, who is 'stunned and delighted' by its evolution, and application to a wide range of discriminatory practices world-wide.

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