Friday, 6 March 2015

Weekend reading and viewing: 7th - 8th March 2015



Diversity and Inclusion – Love Has No Labels
Ad Council, 3rd March 2015
While the vast majority of Americans consider themselves unprejudiced, many of us unintentionally make snap judgments about people based on what we see—whether it’s race, age, gender, religion, sexuality, or disability. This may be a significant reason many people in the U.S. report they feel discriminated against. Subconscious prejudice—called “implicit bias”—has profound implications for how we view and interact with others who are different from us. 



learning disability today, 4th March 2015
Taking part in dance classes helps improve the physical and mental wellbeing of students with special educational needs (SEN), according to research from the Institute for Voluntary Action Research.

The researchers found that of the young people who participate in dance classes 88% feel better able to express themselves and 75% feel more physically fit ...


This Is Just a Start ...
Dave Hingsburger, Rolling Around in My Head, 5th March 2015
"In the summer people can see I have Down Syndrome and they stare at me all the time. In winter, with my (hood) up, they treat me nicer because they can't see me very well."
Amy Julia Becker, Parent.com, 5th March 2015
When our daughter Penny was diagnosed with Down syndrome at birth, I experienced many of the emotions that are typical for parents who receive unexpected news about their child. I felt guilt, sadness, and fear, especially when I looked ahead at what seemed like an unknown and difficult future for our family. Back then, one of my biggest sources of sorrow stemmed from my belief that Penny wouldn’t share my love of reading ...
Parker Myles, 5th March 2015
... These three siblings all have designer genes- ALL three children have Trisomy 21, the most common form of Down syndrome. Trisomy 21 is a random event and not hereditary, so it is amazing that this family has three beautiful biological children with the condition ...

Inclusive Education Program kicks off Semester 1
Centre for Disability Studies (University of Sydney), March 2015
Ten students with an intellectual disability have joined the Inclusive Education Program hosted by the Centre for Disability Studies to participate in lectures and university life over the next two years. The semester kicked off with a range of activities including an Orientation Day ...

Why I chose to homeschool our son who has Down syndrome
Kari Wagner-Peck, Daily Life, 5th March 2015
... our son, who has Down syndrome, attended public school in a regular classroom setting — often referred to as inclusion — at our request. After two years we realised school was hindering his education.

In school, he was hugged and picked up by other children. He was helped by peers whether he wanted it or not. Our son is very small and has difficulty being understood. Even when he yelled, "Stop!" he was mostly ignored. His identity was that of the class mascot. He sat in the back of the classroom while other students participated in group activities, counting to four with his one-to-one aid. At home, he could count to 50 ...

Embracing Wade, 2nd March 2015
Recently Wade’s communication has been really taking off, and with it has come a new sense of independence and knowledge about what he likes and doesn’t like. He is more opinionated and his sense of humour is really coming alive! Now that there is a bit of to and fro to our conversations, it’s like he has more ownership in a conversation which is beautiful to watch ...

A Non-Random Act of Kindness by Kerry Fender
Kerry Fender, Down's Syndrome Association (blog), 27th February 2015
... ‘I heard on the grapevine that you’d had a baby with Down’s syndrome,’ she said. ‘I didn’t know anyone else who’d got a child with the condition when I had my boy, and I just wanted to say this to you: the scary times — when they’re little and they’re poorly — they do get better.’ She cooed over Freddie and we swapped stories ...


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