Saturday, 23 July 2016

Weekend reading and viewing: 23 - 24 July 2016


A follow up interview:
Georgia captures hearts with live TV video bomb
The West Australian, 21 July 2016
Meet the girl who captured the hearts of millions of people across the world when she video bombed a Channel 7 news report ...

What The LGBTQ Community Taught Me About Parenting My Son With Down Syndrome

Anne Pennistin Grunsted, Role Reboot, 15 July 2016
For as much as we strive to eliminate bias against our children, we parents also need to prepare our kids for the reality of a world that will not always be kind ...

In Down syndrome’s shadow, she is perfect in her own way
Beverly Beckham, Boston Globe, 15 July 2016
For a long time, after my granddaughter Lucy, who has Down syndrome, was born, I looked at healthy, typical babies with envy ... Thirteen years later, I wish I could go back in time and tell that frightened me that ... Lucy would be loved, and not out of pity ...

Frustrated, fed up family leaves Canada after son with Down syndrome complicates immigration
Gilbert Ngabo, Metro News (Canada), 15 July 2016
... “They had promised news for me by the end of June but now are saying I will have to wait until fall,” Felipe Montoya told Metro in an email from Coast Rica.

Montoya moved his family to Canada when he accepted a job as an environmental studies professor at York University. But, when they applied for permanent residency in 2013, the Montoyas were told their son could be an undue burden to the country’s health system ...



Heather Libby, Upworthy, 19 July 2016
Twin sisters Judith and Joyce Scott's life story sounds straight out of a movie.

It's a story with everything you'd imagine in an Oscar-winning movie: an idyllic childhood, heart-shattering loss, an emotional reunion followed by triumph, and resounding artistic acclaim. Above all, it's two sisters who loved each other beyond adversity and through everything. And it's 100% true ...


This is how it feels when you say “I don't see your disability”
Carly Findlay, 19 July 2016
... I don’t want you to use euphemisms when referring to disability. Say the word.

I don’t want you to stare, point, ridicule and ask questions before you've said hello, but I don’t mind if you talk about my disability politely after you've gotten to know me.

I want you to see my disability as a part of me.

Because, when you say "I don’t see your disability", you invalidate who I am.


Using PBS in Australian disability services
Brent Hayward, NSW CID blog (guest post) July 2016
PBS stands for positive behaviour support. PBS is a way of supporting people with intellectual disabilities to have a better life and help them to stop using behaviours which hurt other people or themselves. It might sound like PBS is the right way to go, and that’s true! We’ve known about PBS for about 30 years and we know that it works because there is lots of research about it . But what we don’t know very well is how to use PBS in Australian disability services ...

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