Monday, 26 September 2016

On representation ...

Putting kids with special needs in ads isn't just about making moms feel good
Maureen Wallace, She Knows, 19 September 2016
... My son has Down syndrome, and seeing diversity in advertising fills my heart as much as it empties my wallet. But while companies that practice diversity in advertising may be driven by sales, the social benefits are life-changing.

My child needs to see himself reflected in the world, and the world needs to see my son and people who share his differences reflected in the barrage of images hitting us daily ...


Diversity, difference and disability and how nine-year-old Knox Gibson is helping change media portrayals
Meanie Pearce and Julie Clift, ABC Central West, 15 September 2016
... That gave me a platform to raise this issue of underrepresentation in the media, which is really important. It ties into how people perceive disability and whether they're in or out ...

Disabled people don’t want to be your inspiration, but if they are it’s no surprise
Tom Shakespeare, The Conversation, 15 September 2016
Should we be inspired by Paralympian achievement? Commentator Frances Ryan recently counselled Guardian readers to be careful to think through their reactions to disabled “superhuman” athletes and academic poster boys like Professor Stephen Hawking. Treat people with disabilities just like everyone else, is the argument. Don’t see us as special. If we have overcome anything, it’s more relevant to highlight the barriers that a disabling world sets in our way, not our medical problems ...

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