Monday, 4 August 2014

Responses to the story of baby Gammy

There have been many media reports and discussions around Australia and internationally over the last few days. The story of what actually happened is still emerging, but aspects are clear-cut (Gammy, who has Down syndrome, a heart condition and a twin, was left in Thailand). These are just some of the more considered responses we have read (see this post from Friday, too):

We're the family they didn't want to be
Catia Malaquias, Australian Women's Weekly, 4th August 2014
... Gammy's story stirred up so many emotions in me that I found it hard to think about much else throughout the day. The situation is now unclear as the alleged parents have claimed they didn't know about Gammy while the surrogate mother says that they did. But if the story of Gammy's abandonment is true, including reports that it is only one of many such tragedies, it is shocking to think that in some ways we are the type of family that those parents didn’t want to be ...

Because not doing it is harder
Leticia Keighley, Embracing Wade, 1st August 2014
... How is it that difference and disability is so feared and so misunderstood that getting on a plane and flying away, leaving your own child with a woman who cannot care for him to the extent that he may well die….is actually the preferred option? ...

Which is the harder choice after a prenatal diagnosis: continuing or terminating?
Mark Leach, Down Syndrome Prenatal Testing, 1st August 2014
... I took as a given that most people would view terminating a pregnancy following a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome as still a hard choice, but not as hard as raising a child with Down syndrome. No doubt, that is the analysis done by parents who do choose to terminate. But, I think Keighley makes a very good point: that choosing to not be there for your child is actually the harder choice ...

No comments: