Friday, 1 August 2014

Weekend reading and viewing: 2nd - 3rd August 2014





VATTA (Canadian Down Syndrome Society), 28th July 2014. 
Have you ever wondered what prenatal testing means to people with Down syndrome? A group of nine adults with Down syndrome want to share their overlooked perspective on this topic, in the film What Prenatal Testing Means To Me, available to watch on the Canadian Down Syndrome Society’s website. 
The film stars VATTA (Voices At The Table Advocacy), the Canadian Down Syndrome Society’s self-advocate-led steering committee. These remarkable adults, ranging in ages 22 to 43, reflect on their hopes and fears for the future of Down syndrome in Canada and around the world. 
Prenatal testing is a complex and controversial subject. VATTA’s view is simple: If people have fair and balanced information about Down syndrome, and take the time to know and learn more about people with Down syndrome, they will be able to make a better choice for themselves and their families. VATTA wants everyone to “See the Ability” and not believe misconceptions or fears about Down syndrome. 
The film was originally presented as a session at the 2014 Canadian Down Syndrome Conference in response to a growing number of concerns by parents and expectant parents regarding prenatal testing. 
VATTA’s mission is to help all Canadians “See the ability.” VATTA helps self-advocates use their voice and stand up for what they believe in. VATTA has been part of the Canadian Down Syndrome Society since 2005.

Gillian Marchenko, 8th July 2014
... Polly’s good moments resoundingly beat out her bad. Oh, of course she is human; mean and selfish and sneaky. “Polly, are your toys cleaned up?” “Yes,” she lies, happily running on to her next activity. But also, there’s this: she is a bell that rings daily. She was made to exude sunshine. She does her job well ...

What is the risk of not having a great life?
Stay Up Late, 29th July 2014
... These sessions were all built around talking about those impossible blocks that simply can’t be removed and get in the way of people leading the lives they really want, and how we can remove them. Here’s the run down of those top 10 blocks ...

Seeing the Child, Not the Disability
Dennis Rosen, New York Times (blogs), 24th July 2014
..."I like the people in health care. People in health care, they don’t stare at my son like he’s some kind of freak, you know? They see him for who he is.” ...

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