Wednesday, 9 April 2014

New resources on sexuality/sex education and assessing consent

New additions to the growing body of good quality information and resources about sexuality education designed to specifically meet the needs of those with intellectual disability are always welcome.  These two are the latest to come to our notice, both are freely available:

Sexuality education is vital for teens with intellectual disabilitiesLeslie Walker-Hirsch, Expert Beacon
... Many parents ask, “Does my child really need sexuality education?” The answer is an emphatic yes. A person with a cognitive, intellectual or developmental disability needs the same information about sexuality that everyone else needs in order to be a safe, healthy and responsible member of the community. This article provides first steps for parents and teachers--and clears up some misunderstandings about social and sexual development of individuals with intellectual disabilities ...


The release of a useful and necessary new assessment tool was announced on Dave Hingsburger's blog, Rolling Around in My Head, yesterday:  
Two agencies, Vita Community Living Services and The Centre for Behaviour Health Science, have worked together since November 23 of 2012 to create a new assessment tool: The Assessment of Levels of Knowledge - Sexuality and Consent (TALK-SC).  
The tool can be used as a pre/post test for sex education or relationship training classes. It also can be used to determine if a person with an intellectual disability can give consent in the area of sexuality and relationships.   
The tool is designed such that if someone, undergoing a consent assessment, does not pass, the score will give information that will allow education to be pinpointed to the exact areas of need. TALK - SC will be released tomorrow, free of charge.  
Any clinician, educator or agency who wishes a copy of the assessment tool may simply request one by sending an email to dhingsburger@vitacls.org
The Down Syndrome NSW members' library holds several books and videos useful for supporting sex/relationship education for people with Down syndrome from an early age.

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