Friday, 11 April 2014

Weekend reading and viewing: 12th - 13th April 2014


Life soars on
Sipping Lemonade, 4th April 2014
... After Kate’s Down syndrome diagnosis at birth, I wondered what the future would hold for our family. Would we have more children?  ... Would life go on? Little did I know ... 

To the typical siblings,
Ellen Stumbo, Finding Beauty in Brokenness, 9th April 2014
... You can be annoyed by hands pulling at you, and suddenly be a willing participant in the biggest, sweetest embrace that any siblings could ever share. I see the love in your eyes for your sibling, and I cannot believe that the two of you can share this kind of love. It’s not typical, but it runs so deep, and it reflects a quiet strength in you that brings me to tears ...
I stood up for my son today and it felt good
Embracing Wade, 5th April 2014
... sometimes I feel like I talk the talk rather than walk the walk. It’s one thing to tell the world from the safety and comfort of my couch about respect for people with disabilities and it’s another thing entirely to tell it to someone’s face ...
Sally Felkai, Down Syndrome Research Foundation, 8th April 2014
... I stand watching my dear girl with her pals, having the best time. I see that she is not like them but she is also not that different. They all play together and all a little apart from each other. They wander around and find things they are interested in ...
The Happy Soul Project, 8th April 2014
... Pip has a lot of what these definitions state but she is not defined by it. She is more than low muscle tone, heart defects, and facial features ...

Real Friends?
sassysoutherngal, 9th April 2014
Rachel came home from school yesterday and started asking me questions. “Were you invited to birthday parties when you were growing up, mommy?” ...

Why closing Stockton Centre divides disability advocates: opinion
Sue O’Reilly, Newcastle Herald, 7th April 2014
Around Australia, disability rights activists are baying for the closure of the Stockton Centre, attacking the motives and integrity of anyone fighting to keep it open.

Few, if any, have ever visited the place. Few, if any, have the slightest idea what conditions are like for the 400 or so intellectually disabled people now living there. It could be a Dickensian hell-hole or Newcastle's answer to Club Med. For disability advocates, however, it's completely irrelevant ...


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