Friday, 4 July 2014

Weekend reading and viewing: 5th - 6th July 2014


Why my son does not make me a 'special kind of person'
Mary Evelyn Smith (guest blogger), Finding Beauty in My Brokenness, 2nd July 2014
... I am not pretending that my son is just like everyone else. But when we glorify his friends, or his mother, or his one-day prom date, we imply that he is less-than. We imply that those with disabilities are not equally lovable—that it takes someone “special” to muster up this kind of affection. It seems we reveal our innermost bias—at least I think I did ...

I never knew I wanted a child with Down syndrome until I got one
Meriah Nichol, A Little Moxie, 2nd July 2013
... Pregnant with Moxie, I’d read things about how much mothers loved their little ones with Down syndrome and I thought things along the lines of, “that’s great, that’s wonderful, silver linings and all, good for them but I’d rather have a kid without Down syndrome, thanks”. I think in my heart of hearts, I didn’t believe it was possible for someone to truly be accepting of an intellectual disability, or to honestly see something anything desirable about it ...   

Ramp Up’s shut-down robs us of a needed voice on disability issues
Shawn Burns, The Conversation, 30th June 2014
... Too often, media representation of people with disability is embedded within familiar models of “tragedy” and “hero” – but the weekend’s coverage of potential changes to the disability support pension and the welfare system paint an equally distorted and harmful image ...


Dancing like everyone's watching
Stella  Young Ramp Up 27th June 2014
Sometimes it seems that anything you do in a non-normative body is somehow political. Stella Young feels this is particularly true for a wheelchair user on a dance floor ...
  • The last new, original content posted on the now defunded ABC website, Ramp Up.
Calls
Dave Hingsburger, Rolling Around in My Head, 27th June 2014
... The fact that people with disabilities have free access to pick up a phone and call a director and ask for meeting times to discuss their lives, the treatment plan in place and their future is simply awesome ...

Workforce Transformation: From Caregivers to Direct Support Professionals
Service, Support and Success, Volume 3, #7, July 2014
The most important staff in any organization are those who work directly with the individuals with developmental disabilities. They have the greatest impact on the individuals and deserve much recognition and gratitude for all of their hard work. Most of the direct staff want the best for the people they support and try to do an excellent job. Yet the message they often receive from many agencies and the government is that they are direct care workers or caregivers. In New York State, there is a new initiative to transform the workforce from being caregivers to being a direct support professional.

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