Friday, 27 June 2014

Weekend reading and viewing: 28th - 29th June 2014


When a woman noticed my daughter because she has Down syndrome
Ellen Stumbo, Finding Beauty in My Brokenness, 24th June 2014
... Sometimes people stare at my daughter because she has Down syndrome, sometimes I can tell by the way they look at her that they feel pity, but not this time, and not this woman and her sister ...

Buts and Rebuts
Autistic Speaks, 19th June 2014
When it comes to reasons why parents are hesitant about – even outright against – autism acceptance, there are a series of “buts…” that come up over and over again ... So, every time I see one of the “buts” come up, I desperately want to engage that person in conversation and try to help them get a bigger view of the situation, a zoomed-out perspective, so that maybe they will see the validity, the rightness, dare I say, of accepting autism ...
* I think this is the best thing I've ever read about what it means to be autistic. And, the writer makes so many points that could equally be applied when thinking about Down syndrome, and probably other disabilities. Wow. (Jackie Softly, Co-CEO Down Syndrome Australia)

Mother Recalls How She Came To Terms With Her Daughter's Down Syndrome
Huff Post Live, 4th June 2014
Tara McCallon can remember the first time she ever articulated that her daughter had down syndrome. She was in the hospital gift shop ...

Stay or go? Country families' dilemma on children with disabilities
Bush Telegraph (ABC Radio National), 20th June 2014
Meet 12 year old Reggie Happ. He loves tenpin bowling and swimming and has two great mates who, like him, have Down Syndrome. He's in year seven at high school in Bathurst, New South Wales, where a dedicated teaching assistant helps him stay in touch with the curriculum. But it wasn't always like this. When he lived in the small town of Coonamble out west of Dubbo, he struggled to find a suitable friendship group ...
Heather Kirnlanier, Star in Her Eye, 5th January 2014
... Then, at another appointment, Doctor Normal looked at the sizes of my two children in the office (the oldest is two pounds lighter than the youngest) and asked me, without any pretense or awareness, How is it, having a normal child? ...

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