Monday, 1 May 2017

New books

Not Always Happy,
Kari Wagner-Peck, Central Recovery Press, 2017
While most people meet their child for the first time in a delivery room, some parents have to meet their child in the reception area of an administrative building.  
Not Always Happy is a humorous and sharp chronicle about adopting and raising a son with Down syndrome from the Maine foster care system. The author quickly learns that life is best lived by expecting the unplanned when she makes the decision to become a parent in her late forties. As her unconventional family moves along in this life, she and her husband are less aware they are raising an atypical child or an adopted child. They are raising their child, and their family struggles with the same universal themes that any family goes through ...
  • Due for release 16 May 2017 in print and as an eBook

The Lucky Few: Finding God's Best in the Most Unlikely Places
Heather Avis, Zondervan, 2017
When I started my journey into parenthood I never thought it would look like this. I never planned on having three adopted children, and I certainly never imagined that two of them would have Down syndrome ... It’s only the lucky few that recognize that the most beautiful things in this life are often found in the differences. What some would see as misfortune, I’ve learned to see as nothing more than pure luck.

Down's Syndrome Screening and Reproductive Politics: Care, Choice, and Disability in the Prenatal Clinic
Gareth M. Thomas, Routledge, 2017
In the UK and beyond, Down’s syndrome screening has become a universal programme in prenatal care. But why does screening persist, particularly in light of research that highlights pregnant women’s ambivalent and problematic experiences with it? 
Drawing on an ethnography of Down’s syndrome screening in two UK clinics, Thomas explores how and why we are so invested in this practice and what effects this has on those involved. Informed by theoretical approaches that privilege the mundane and micro practices, discourses, materials, and rituals of everyday life, Down’s Syndrome Screening and Reproductive Politics describes the banal world of the clinic and, in particular, the professionals contained within it who are responsible for delivering this programme. In so doing, it illustrates how Down’s syndrome screening is ‘downgraded’ and subsequently stabilised as a ‘routine’ part of a pregnancy. Further, the book captures how this routinisation is deepened by a systematic, but subtle, framing of Down’s syndrome as a negative pregnancy outcome. By unpacking the complex relationships between professionals, parents, technology, policy, and clinical practice, Thomas identifies how and why screening is successfully routinised and how it is embroiled in both new and familiar debates surrounding pregnancy, ethics, choice, diagnosis, care, disability, and parenthood. 
The book will appeal to academics, students, and professionals interested in medical sociology, medical anthropology, science and technology studies (STS), bioethics, genetics, and/or disability studies.

This one is not new, but NSW CID has stocks available for sale:

Forgotten and Found
Kim Walker, NSW Council for Intellectual Disability
Written by NSW CID Life Member Kim Walker, this book tells her story from childhood, to institutions, to community life and to becoming an amazing advocate! 
Kim tells us the story of her life to explain why no child should grow up in an institution and separated from family. Kim’s story provides a powerful case for what she always wanted – all disability institutions to be closed and all people with disability to have a good life in the community ...

No comments: